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Surprised to love Kafka

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Old 10-14-2012, 08:18 AM
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Default Surprised to love Kafka


Is there anyone else here who has an opinion on Metamorphosis by Kafka? I have just read it and I was completely bowled over by the bizarre brilliance, the playful humour, the intensity of the expression of desperate loneliness and isolation, the pathos. Never having read any Kafka before, I had a vague idea that his work was strange in an abstract, unapproachable sort of a way, and had therefore avoided his work until now. What an incredible and unexpected experience to feel so moved by the story of a man waking up to find he has turned into a giant bug! Completely unforgettable and unique, will stay with me forever.


Last edited by Julia_V; 10-14-2012 at 08:19 AM.. Reason: spelling mistake
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:11 AM
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'Metamorphosis' is funny and sad, hard to forget as you say. I've never really managed to get into anything else by Kafka, though.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:42 PM
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Kafka was a phenomenal writer. Metamorphosis is probably his most accessible work, but try his other books too.

If you liked Metamorphosis you should also try Nausea by JP Satre and Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse.
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Old 10-17-2012, 06:16 PM
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Metamorphosis was... new, refreshing maybe. I don't think I appreciated it a lot back when I read it (I think I was 12), and if I read it today (three years later) I suppose I'd have the same opinion.
Not that I dislike Kafka, but I might just have to read it when I'm older. Plus, rarely do I find a text I really like.

But, as said above, unforgettable =D
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Old 10-20-2012, 09:18 PM
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I thought the same, but I am glad to hear otherwise. I will have to grab that book.
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Old 01-29-2013, 04:35 AM
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I read that as a project in my Sophomore year of HS... I remember reading ahead, tuning everyone else out and being scolded for it later... ugh, I could rant on for hours. Anyways, I absolutely loved it... it managed to be subtly humorous and incredibly sad at the exact same time. Its not that often that you feel so much sympathy and sadness for a fictional character. Kafka did a splendid job of writing something that the reader will never be able to forget about, no matter how much they read. I havent read anything else by him though. Does anyone have any suggestions of his best works? I probably wouldnt know where to begin.
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:19 AM
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Best starting point is to get an anthology of his short stories.
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Old 02-10-2013, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike C View Post
Kafka was a phenomenal writer. Metamorphosis is probably his most accessible work, but try his other books too.

If you liked Metamorphosis you should also try Nausea by JP Satre and Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse.
Franz Kafka was one of the great writer of our time. He had a great contempt for any kind of authority...he was a neuroti...which gave him the power to write great works like..."The Trial," and the "Castle." Writing such as that can't be learned...it has to come from deep inside...where all the trouble is.
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Old 05-25-2013, 09:32 PM
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Kafka's works are deeply psychological, dramatic and surrealist. for example the metamorphosis is quite a mysterious story, I mean it would be understood through different perspectives. so I'm going to view my own personal perspective on it. the story starts with e the following he wakes up and finds himself turned into a monstrous vermin, then he seems to have an arched back and completely unable to move in his bed, he barely is able to move at all, he then... the protagonist "Gregor Samsa" sees the clock which strikes at the time of his duty for the job as a sells man he was devoted for this job to repay the family's debts. so in a word he was a deliberate slave to his boss, after waking up and get metamorphosed, the only thing that he thinks of was going to work, then minute after minute he loses time and still struggling, and as a sign for anxiety, he has many legs which moves voluntarily Well, the story has so many symbolism in it, then he gets late and his mother is checking on him but the room's door was closed because he had the habit of closing the doors just like the business indicates. he talks in an inhuman voice and says that he will come. but still he cannot come out of his room like that. his greatest fears is getting late for the job, then he kept struggling to move out from the bed and he feared knocking his head, so he crawled to the door of his room and opened it with his jaws, he also had the habit to snap his jaws like animals, he bleeds while trying to open the door, he bleeds brown blood which means that he's already dead and his blood is getting rotten. then the door opens and the whole family confront the shock of his metamorphosis. so his father who was too cruel on him tried to chase him with the broom then he throws an apple on him which sticks in his back literally and hurt him so badly, it's a reference to Adam's forbidden fruit which is in a way a sign of the curse of being human, after everything have gotten quiet which is a sign of a calamity that left a shock and the end of everything, that was the first chapter. The second chapter starts with the phrase, Samsa woke up from a coma like sleep. then as time passes he's getting used to the idea of being an insect and trying to live along with this curse, he then eats milk instead of cheese which means he's gotten weaker a symbolism. and the 2nd chapter narrates the family history, then at the last chapter business men came to stay at their house and pay money for that because of the financial problems they have, the people who stayed there and rented the house was living with them. they were three business bearded men, one of them is the leader and other two are his followers, that is a symbolism of Samsa, the boss, and and the manager. there is just so much symbolism in a way that I can't start which from which, Well, at the end he dies and the family lives happily and they decided to move to another house and was searching for a husband to his sister which was the closest to him in the family and which was a talented violinist who's her music made Samsa weep as a symbolism of melancholy. my theory is that the story is a dream inside a dream, and it's a chapter inside a chapter... or barely a hallucination of how Grogor Samsa sees himself. like a slave like an insect, something too insignificant. and it's all because of the family issues. Gregor was a good son, unlike the short story by Kafka "The judgment" which in the opposite side the protagonist was George the opposite spelling of Gregor somehow, and George was a bad son. including the first Chapter of Amerika the three stories "The Metamorphosis", "The Judgment", "The First Chapter of Amerika" was published as the sons. so in the end Gregor didn't not turn into an insect but was something fare more spiritual and mental, deeply psychological. another perspective indicates that it was an existential absurdity.
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Old 05-31-2013, 04:11 PM
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Luckily, Essam, Kafka's writing is far easier to read than your critique (I presume that's what it is) whick is dull and impenetrable.

Did nobody ever tell you what a paragraph is, or what they are for?
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